This is the twentieth global report on tuberculosis (TB) published by WHO in a series that started in 1997.

A new WHO report highlights the urgent need to reduce emissions of black carbon, ozone and methane - as well as carbon dioxide – which all contribute to climate change.

The Global status report on road safety 2015, reflecting information from 180 countries, indicates that worldwide the total number of road traffic deaths has plateaued at 1.25 million per year, with the highest road traffic fatality rates in low-income countries.

By 2050, the number of people over the age of 60 is set to double. The "World report on ageing and health" highlights the need for major societal change, to ensure that people are not just living longer, but also healthier, lives.

The World Health Organization’s new Noncommunicable Disease Progress Monitor tracks the extent to which 194 countries are implementing their commitments to develop national responses to the global burden of NCDs.

Malaria death rates have plunged by 60% since 2000, translating into 6.2 million lives saved, the vast majority of them children, according to a joint WHO-UNICEF report released today.

Climate variability and change are exacerbating many current climate-sensitive health outcomes and have the potential to affect the ability of health system institutions and organizations to maintain or improve health burdens in the context of changing climate and development patterns.

The World Health Organization (WHO) unveiled a global plan to better integrate water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services with four other public health interventions to accelerate progress in eliminating and eradicating neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) by 2020.

In 2007, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicted that global mean temperature will increase by between 1.0 and 6.5 degrees Centigrade within the next 90 years.

Worldwide, nearly 1 in 10 people have a mental health disorder, but only 1% of the global health workforce is working in mental health. This means, for example, that nearly half of the world’s population lives in a country where there is less than one psychiatrist per 100 000 people.

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