Transforming food systems under a changing climate entails amplifying solutions that build sustainability along multiple interconnected principles—i.e., diversity, resilience, equity, economic viability, health and renewability.

Policy-making processes in developing countries often continue to operate devoid of evidence. In this study, explore the research-policy linkages between the agroeconomic research system (AERS) and the agricultural policy system (APS) in India.

Agrifood systems are powerful levers for improving livelihoods. They must also address an array of systemic challenges, including satisfying growing global food demand, improving diets, limiting greenhouse gas emissions, adapting to a warming climate, and sustaining the environment.

Sustained growth and improved governance in Africa’s agriculture sector are critical to meeting the continent’s development goals, including creating decent jobs for youth, nourishing growing cities with healthy foods, promoting resilience, and catalyzing domestic revenue mobilization.

Agrifood systems cannot be transformed unless there is gender equality. That was the simple message underlying the launch of a new report by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the African Union that puts the spotlight on women's role in agrifood systems.

Through extensive research, analysis, and stakeholder consultation, the report aims to identify the high priority actions that must collectively take now, for climate change adaptation and mitigation in food systems. Taken together, these actions are the basis of the systemic transformation that is needed in food systems.

The aim of this study is to identify how Africa may transform its potentials into realities and actually secure its supply of food for affordable and healthy diets from the sustainable use of resources. Africa’s food imports amount to about US$ 60 billion per year.

Agri-food production remains vital to the economies in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). Food systems are rapidly changing and are driven by income growth, (urban) population growth, shifts in dietary preferences, and agricultural productivity growth.

COVID-19 is a global health crisis that has caused a shock to food and agricultural systems around the world, affecting production, supply chains, trade, markets, and people’s livelihoods and nutrition.

Southeast Asia made considerable progress in building and strengthening its agricultural R&D capacity during 2000–2017. All of the region’s countries reported higher numbers of agricultural researchers, improvements in their average qualification levels, and higher shares of women participating in agricultural R&D.

Pages