This paper briefly analyses the major factors that accounted for decreased greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions excluding land use, land use changes and forestry (LULUCF) in the EU-28. It consists of two parts: the first part looks at the year 2014 compared to 2013 and the second part looks at the whole period between 1990 and 2014.

International carbon offsetting can help reduce compliance costs in emissions trading schemes and at the same time support carbon mitigation projects in developing countries.

From 2013 onwards, emission allowances are no longer granted for free to power companies under the EU’s Emissions Trading System (EU ETS). These companies instead have to buy all of their allowances through auctions.

As the world moves on from the climate agreement negotiated in Paris, attention is turning from the identification of emissions reduction trajectories—in the form of Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs)—to crucial questions about how these emissions reductions are to be delivered and reported within the future international accounting fram

This study has calculated the additional profits that sectors and companies have made from the EU ETS from 2008 to 2014, distinguishing between three types of profits: Profits from over allocation of free emission allowances.

The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) has helped finance more than 2000 hydropower projects, representing the largest source of OECD bilateral funding for hydropower. Europe, through its European Union Emissions Trading Scheme, has been the major supporter.

The International Carbon Action Partnership’s Status Report 2016 shows emissions trading is gaining ever more importance in the fight against climate change.

Countries should set targets to increase public investment in low-carbon research and development (R&D) slowly and steadily beyond 2020, according to a report published by the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at London School of Economics and Political Science.

In a report published as part of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) Staff Discussion Note (SDN) series, experts examine the role that fiscal polices can play in assisting countries to implement the Paris Agreement adopted at the end of 2015.

A new paper discusses the current and potential interaction between nationally appropriate mitigation actions (NAMAs) and intended nationally determined contributions (INDCs).

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