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Some of the most profound and direct impacts of climate change over the next few decades will be on agricultural and food systems. A research by Lobell et al show that increasing temperatures and declining precipitation over semiarid regions are likely to reduce yields for corn, wheat, rice, and other primary crops in the next two decades. These changes could have a substantial impact on global food security.

Contrary to what it says in the song, the rain in Spain does not stay mainly in the plain. It falls mostly in the mountainous regions of Cantabria and Asturias. Ask meteorologists why, and they will explain that the prevailing winds pick up moisture over the Atlantic, and that when this moist air hits Spain's northern mountain ranges it is forced up to higher altitudes, where the moisture condenses to form clouds, and then rain. So far so good - except that it's only half an answer.

Large swathes of the usually humid southern China are currently facing drought, described as the worst in 50 years. The drought has left over a million people short of drinking water and has shrunk

The forest biome of Amazonia is one of Earth's greatest biological treasures and a major component of the Earth system. This century, it faces the dual threats of deforestation and stress from climate change. In this article, the authors summarize some of the latest findings and thinking on these threats, explore the consequences for the forest ecosystem and its human residents, and outline options for the future of Amazonia.

Annual extreme rainfall series of 1-3 day durations at stations located inside the Indus basin in India were subjected to statistical analysis in order to estimate point Probable Maximum Precipitation (PMP) and maximum rainfall of different return periods for the durations of 1-3 days.

In 1971, meteorologists Roland Madden and Paul Julian studied weather data from near equatorial Pacific islands. To their surprise, tropospheric winds, pressure and rainfall oscillated with a period of about 40 to 50 days.

A Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is a massive weather event consisting of deep convection coupled with atmospheric circulation, moving slowly eastward over the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Despite its enormous influence on many weather and climate systems worldwide, it has proven very difficult to simulate an MJO because of assumptions about cumulus clouds in global meteorological models.

I read newspapers and I watch the news unfold on scores of television channels. But in spite of these sources that keep me informed about current affairs, I would not know that floods are still

Rainfall intensities measured at a few stations in Kerala during 2001–2005 using a disdrometer were found to be in reasonable agreement with the total rainfall measured using a manual rain gauge. The temporal distributions of rainfall intensity at different places and during different months show that rainfall is of low intensity ( indication of the relative prevalence of stratiform and cumuliform clouds.

In this article meteorological measurements in India are analysed showing marked trends of increasing temperature over the past quarter century, but significant variations in these trends during different seasons and over different regions of India. Marked differences between the variations in minimum temperatures in North and South India have been brought out.

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