Carbon pricing is the most cost-effective policy to address the climate challenge. Following the Paris Agreement, a first acceleration in the implementation of carbon pricing schemes has been observed and can expect a further acceleration over the next few years, as countries ratchet up their climate goals under their Paris commitments.

One certainty under climate change is that global ocean levels are rising. A new report led by Washington Sea Grant and the University of Washington’s Climate Impacts Group provides the clearest picture yet of what to expect in Washington state.

This discussion brief explores the possibility of a “climate test” for new industrial development by focusing on a case study in the U.S. State of Washington. The debate in Washington over a new chemical facility – to make methanol, a building block of plastics – has centered on its GHG emissions.

This paper examines how best to use revenues from a carbon tax to achieve both climate and non-climate goals, identifying pitfalls and strategies to avoid them. As many governments around the world consider carbon taxes (and other forms of carbon pricing), a common question is what to do with the revenue they generate.

A Washington State University study of the chemistry of technetium-99 has improved understanding of the challenging nuclear waste and could lead to better cleanup methods.

This report describes a comprehensive, transparent, and flexible tool that cities can use to identify the greatest risks, successes, and priorities for decreasing urban vulnerability and increasing resilience to climate change. Case studies were conducted with Washington, DC and Worcester, MA to provide examples of the tool’s application.

Washington state is grossly unprepared for a large earthquake and tsunami that may strike in the coming decades, putting it at risk for a humanitarian disaster, the Seattle Times reported on Sunday

Wildlife agents authorized to eradicate a group of 11 wolves for repeated attacks on cattle in Washington state have hunted down and killed six animals from the condemned pack and are searching for

BOISE, IDAHO – Thirty-five large, uncontained wildfires are burning in the West, and firefighters are making initial attacks on another 112 new fires trying to prevent them from getting big.

Dozens of wildfires raged in the arid U.S. West on Tuesday, blackening hundreds of square miles of land and forcing residents from homes in California and Washington state.

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