A UN panel that on Tuesday ruled that glyphosate was probably not carcinogenic to humans has now become embroiled in a bitter row about potential conflicts of interests.

Farming is the biggest single cause of the worst air pollution in Europe, a new study has found, as nitrogen compounds from fertilisers and animal waste drift over industrial regions.

Question raised in Lok Sabha on Conversion of City Waste into Compost Manure, 26/04/2016. The Government of India has approved a policy on promotion of City Compost. The salient features of the policy are at Annexure.

Punjab is one of the most fertile regions in India, where wheat, rice, sugar cane, fruits and vegetables are grown and it is called the “Granary of India” or “India’s bread-basket”. Rice and wheat are double cropped in Punjab with rice stalks being burned off over millions of acres prior to the planting of wheat. This widespread practice is polluting and wasteful. In Punjab the consumption of fertilizer per hectare is 223.46 kg as compared to 90 kg nationally.

To provide better agriculture facilities to the farmers of the State, Punjab Government has provided 1.15 lakh Soil Health Cards to the farmers through its agriculture department.

Countries where agriculture is a major economic activity have greater room for improving key regulations that govern the agribusiness sector says this new World Bank report. 

The Union Cabinet, chaired by the Prime Minister Shri Narendra Modi has given its approval for a Policy on Promotion of City Compost. Under the policy, a provision has been made for Market development assistance of Rs. 1500 per tonne of city compost for scaling up production and consumption of the product.

Cooperative giant IFFCO has initiated a soil health card scheme while celebrating the “soil health fortnight” in the Abohar area.

During 1945 to 1980, nitrate levels in large U.S. rivers increased up to fivefold in intensively managed agricultural areas of the Midwest, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey study.

Fertiliser companies are among the world's top climate villains, a new report from GRAIN asserts. Their products could be responsible for up to 10% of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, not to mention the damage wreaked on waterways, soils and the ozone layer.

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