Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a priority for surveillance in bacterial infections.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) yesterday signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with an Indian firm, Centre for Science and Environment (CSE), to build the capacity of the agency in

Each year wildland fires kill and injure trees on millions of forested hectares globally, affecting plant and animal biodiversity, carbon storage, hydrologic processes, and ecosystem services. The underlying mechanisms of fire-caused tree mortality remain poorly understood, however, limiting the ability to accurately predict

Measles elimination is greatly under threat, with cases increasing from 19-25 cases per million people. With outbreaks occurring in the Americas, the Eastern Mediterranean, Europe and South-East Asia, measles is now once again endemic in all WHO regions says this 2018 assessment report of the Global Vaccine Action Plan

There is a tension between research and practice in the field of cycling as well as in general in environmental policy. Numerous scientific publications and knowledge do not reach the practitioners who might benefit from them.

Worldwide, the number of new cases of cancer was estimated in 2012 at more than 14 million, and cancer remains one of the leading causes of mortality in France. Among the environmental risk factors for cancer, there are concerns about exposure to different classes of pesticides, notably through occupational exposure.

The microbial communities of mangroves which form important links in elemental cycling and bioremediation have not been elucidated in most parts of the world. Due to urbanization and deforestation mangroves are also under threat.

Maternal pre-conception obesity is a strong risk factor for childhood overweight.

Use of tobacco products is injurious to health in men and women. However, tobacco use by pregnant women receives greater scrutiny because it can also compromise the health of future generations. More men smoke cigarettes than women. Yet the impact of nicotine use by men upon their descendants has not been as widely scrutinized.

Educational policies may increase or decrease health differences, depending on whether they reinforce or counteract gene-related differences. We investigate whether one such policy affected health differently for people with different genetic backgrounds. We find that the additional education generated by the policy benefited those with higher genetic risk of obesity the most, reducing the gap in unhealthy body size between those in the top and bottom terciles of genetic risk of obesity from 20 to 6 percentage points.

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