Present paper summarizes the occurrence of C. riisei in coral reefs of Indian seas, its likely impacts on the indigenous biota and policies for bioinvasion in the Indian context. With the limited information available on marine bioinvasion in tropical countries, especially in India, there is an urgent need of study on the occurrence and impacts of invasive species on the coral reef environment as this ecosystem harbors 25% of total marine biodiversity and contribute 10% fishery production.

The fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda is a prime noctuid pest of maize on the American continents where it has remained confined despite occasional interceptions by European quarantine services in recent years. The pest has currently become a new invasive species in West and Central Africa where outbreaks were recorded for

Global wildlife could plunge to a 67 per cent level of decline in just the fifty-year period ending this decade as a result of human activities, according to WWF’s Living Planet Report 2016.

Ancient woodland is under threat from invasive rhododendron, experts have warned as they revealed the “aggressive” weed now covers woodland the size of 150,000 football pitches.

The Protected Planet Report 2016 has been launched at the IUCN World Conservation Congress in Hawaii.

The Gulf of Maine’s once strong population of wild blue mussels is disappearing, scientists say.

It may be too late to save many species of plants from extinction at the hands (or vines) of invasive plant species.

Globally pollen allergy is a major public health problem, but a fundamental unknown is the likely impact of climate change. To our knowledge, this is the first study to quantify the consequences of climate change upon pollen allergy in humans. The objective of the study was to produce quantitative estimates of the potential impact of climate change upon pollen allergy in humans, focusing upon common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) in Europe.

Most countries in the world have little capacity to deal effectively with invasive species, a study suggests.

The remote Caribbean island of Redonda, part of Antigua and Barbuda, is home to numerous species of plants and animals found nowhere else on earth.

Pages