Ending malnutrition in all forms is a global development priority. Investment in nutrition can yield high returns in terms of reduced health costs, increased productivity and improved human resources capacity and economic growth.

Ending malnutrition in all forms is a global development priority. Investment in nutrition can yield high returns in terms of reduced health costs, increased productivity and improved human resources capacity and economic growth.

In many developing countries, agricultural policies and programs are often designed in a way to promote productivity growth with modern inputs and technologies, and with limited reference to the nutrition gains that gain be made through production diversification.

This study addresses a critical knowledge gap and is a fundamental contribution to inform future planning and priority setting for agriculture-related resource allocations in/across pre-, during and post-emergency contexts. The methodological approach used for disaggregation of data is outlined in Annex 1.

Sub-Saharan African countries have been seeking ways to improve their economies, particularly as problems of malnutrition, poverty, and unemployment continue to plague the people. The challenges that most of the countries face on the continent resemble the challenges that some of the Asian countries have faced.

In recent years, the number of people experiencing hunger – both chronic and acute – has been alarmingly and persistently high.

The African Development Bank, through its African Natural Resource Center (ANRC), is undertaking a study to review the land tenure systems in a number of African countries as part of a wider multi-country level study to support the creation of an enabling environment for Agricultural Transformation on the Continent. The Bank’s Feed Africa Agric

Over the past few decades, the agricultural sector of Southeast Asia has experienced robust growth and undergone a structural transformation albeit differentially across the countries in the region.

Science–policy interfaces are critical in shaping agricultural and environmental governance. However, connecting science with policy has always been a challenge for both scientists and policymakers.

Mr Peddireddy demanded the farmers to unite to save seed independence.

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