Agrifood systems are powerful levers for improving livelihoods. They must also address an array of systemic challenges, including satisfying growing global food demand, improving diets, limiting greenhouse gas emissions, adapting to a warming climate, and sustaining the environment.

Sustained growth and improved governance in Africa’s agriculture sector are critical to meeting the continent’s development goals, including creating decent jobs for youth, nourishing growing cities with healthy foods, promoting resilience, and catalyzing domestic revenue mobilization.

This paper presents a sector-specific methodology for assessing the role of the AFOLU sector within the NDCs. It identifies five core pillars of NDCs and sub-components specific to the AFOLU sector based on a global stocktaking of NDCs and alignment with the Enhanced Transparency Framework of the Paris Agreement.

Between 1992 and 2015, nearly 148 million hectares (Mha) within biodiversity hotspots – biologically rich but threatened terrestrial regions – worldwide underwent land‐cover changes, equating to 6% of the total areal extent of hotspots.

Forest losses in hotspots amounted to 54 Mha (–7% of the forest area present in 1992), driven primarily by agricultural expansion (38 Mha); shrubland or savanna also declined by 23 Mha (–8%). Over the same time, urban areas expanded by 10 Mha (+108%).

Agrifood systems cannot be transformed unless there is gender equality. That was the simple message underlying the launch of a new report by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the African Union that puts the spotlight on women's role in agrifood systems.

Agriculture has been the engine of overall economic growth in developing countries, whereby agriculture significantly contributes to national GDPs, rural employment levels, household food security and trade balance.

There is an urgent need to assess the linkages between diet patterns and environmental sustainability in order to meet global targets for reducing premature mortality and improving sustainable management of natural resources.

The Ministry of Environment, Climate Change, Disaster Management and Meteorology (MECDM) of the Solomon Islands, with the assistance of the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP), developed a report on the state of the environment in the country.

This SEI report discusses efforts to help Indigenous People adapt to climate change by combining their traditional ecological knowledge with scientific and technological sources of information about agriculture and climate change. It is based on a case study of climate field schools conducted in rural Bali.

Gaon Connection releases findings of its unique rural survey on ‘The Indian Farmer’s Perception of the New Agri Laws’.

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