The Ministry of New and Renewable Energy has released the "Draft report on hydrogen energy and fuel cells: a way forward" for public comments. Use of fossil fuels has become a part of daily energy needs and their requirement is increasing with the passage of time.

Worldwide, the vehicle fleet is not making enough progress on fuel economy and is failing to reach global targets aimed at reducing CO2 emissions, cutting oil consumption and improving energy efficiency according to a new report from the Global Fuel Economy Initiative (GFEI) (earlier post) released at the Paris COP21 Climate Summit.

This paper investigates the potential for electric vehicles to contribute toward leading nations’ climate goals.

The Ministry of Road Transport & Highways formulated a Draft Notification for Mass Emission Standards for Bio-diesel (B100) fuelled vehicles. These standards have been long awaited by the industry especially those manufacturing bio-diesel and will provide alternate source of income to the farmers and the forest dwellers.

Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Labeling (VFEL) is used by numerous countries worldwide to improve the fuel efficiency of their transport fleets. The theory behind VFEL is that better-informed consumers are more likely to purchase fuel-efficient vehicles, and that market demand can improve the energy efficiency of the transport sector.

This report assesses the economic costs and benefits of decarbonising passenger cars and vans in the UK. A scenario approach has been developed to assess a range of possible futures for vehicle technology in the UK, and then economic modelling has been applied to assess impacts.

The last update of global fuel economy trends, published in 2013, concluded that, while global average fuel economy was improving, more needs to be done to meet the ambitious, yet realistic, GFEI target to cut by half the specific fuel consumption of new passenger light-duty vehicles (in Lge/100km) by 2030.

The hydrogen market in Japan is set to expand to 1 trillion yen ($9.8 billion) by 2030 and 8 trillion yen by 2050, according to a government report.

Banglore : For the first time in the country, a Hydrogen-powered automobile bus has been developed by Tata Motors and Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) after several years of research.

India only major vehicle producing country in the world without fuel saving standards for cars. By 2030, India will be importing 94 per cent of its crude oil. But the country is making no serious efforts to prepare a fuel saving roadmap for all modes of transport, says CSE.

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