This report provides an overview of the increasing vulnerability of World Heritage sites to climate change impacts and the potential implications for and of global tourism.

The vision of the National Forestry Policy is: “Restore and maintain the country’s environmental integrity, increase and stabilize forest cover to at least 20% of the country’s geographical area, address the emerging challenges of climate change and sustainable flow of ecosystem services, and ensure food security and poverty alleviation by addre

Question raised in Rajya Sabha on Eco-sensitive areas, 25/04/2016.

Nearly half of all natural World Heritage sites are threatened by harmful industrial activities, according to a new WWF report. These sites provide vital services to people and the environment, but are at risk worldwide from activities including oil and gas exploration, mining and illegal logging.

The world-famous Rajaji National Park, Uttarakhand, India has recently been notified as Rajaji Tiger Reserve (RTR). This Protected Area is now the 48th Tiger Reserve in the country and the second in Uttarakhand. Though RNP was established in 1983, final notification for the Park was issued in 2013 because of non-settlement of rights of the local people, which provided a full-fledged legal status to it and strengthened the conservation activities. (Correspondence)

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This publication highlights the unique contribution of ten GEF financed, UNDP supported projects in six tiger range countries (Bhutan, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar and Thailand), demonstrating how conservation activities in tiger habitat can accomplish more than the preservation of one iconic wildlife species.

Many threatened species rely on ecotourism for conservation funding, but simultaneously suffer direct ecological impacts from ecotourism. For a range of IUCN-Redlisted terrestrial and marine bird and mammal species worldwide, we use population viability analyses to calculate the net effects of ecotourism on expected time to extinction, in the presence of other anthropogenic threats such as poaching, primary industries and habitat loss.

The draft third National Wildlife Action Plan (NWAP) 2017-2031 unveiled by the environment ministry accords special emphasis to rehabilitation of threatened species of wildlife while conserving their habitats which include inland aquatic, coastal and marine eco-systems.

The important global, national and local benefits provided by protected areas may come at a cost to communities, and any resultant experience of injustice can undermine protected area conservation.

Extinction rates in the Anthropocene are three orders of magnitude higher than background and disproportionately occur in the tropics, home of half the world’s species. Despite global efforts to combat tropical species extinctions, lack of high-quality, objective information on tropical biodiversity has hampered quantitative evaluation of conservation strategies. In particular, the scarcity of population-level monitoring in tropical forests has stymied assessment of biodiversity outcomes, such as the status and trends of animal populations in protected areas.

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