Telomere length and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content are markers of aging and aging-related diseases. There is inconclusive evidence concerning the mechanistic effects of airborne particulate matter (PM) exposure on biomolecular markers of ageing. The present study examines the association between short- and long-term PM exposure with telomere length and mtDNA content in elderly and investigates to what extend this association is mediated by expression of genes playing a role in the telomere-mitochondrial axis of aging.

East Asia and Pacific is aging faster – and on a larger scale – than any other region in history, which could lead to a steep drop in the size of its workforce and sharp increases in public spending on pensions, health care and long-term care in the coming decades, according to a new World Bank report.

This paper outlines the impacts of climate change which are currently being experienced as evidenced by the IPCC and identifies the current and future implications for older people, including an assessment of how livelihoods, healthcare, nutrition and energy are particularly affected by our changing climate.

The employment of a new “worm index” of human development, together with additional published health information, confirms the important role neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) play in hindering the advancement of many of the world’s Muslim-majority countries.

Original Source

Urban populations are highly vulnerable to the adverse effects of heat, with heat-related mortality showing intra-urban variations that are likely due to differences in urban characteristics and socioeconomic status. The objective was to investigate the influence of urban green and urban blue, i.e., urban vegetation and water bodies, on heat-related excess mortality in the elderly above 65 years in Lisbon, Portugal between 1998 and 2008.

Original Source

By 2050, the number of people over the age of 60 is set to double. The "World report on ageing and health" highlights the need for major societal change, to ensure that people are not just living longer, but also healthier, lives.

This paper: examines long-term care (LTC) protection in 46 developing and developed countries covering 80 per cent of the world’s population; provides (data on LTC coverage for the population aged 65+; identifies access deficits for older persons due to the critical shortfall of formal LTC workers; presents the impacts of insufficient public

he changing global demographic characteristics of dementia have led to worldwide predictions of unaffordable treatment and care costs over the coming decades. Recognition of the economic consequences has encouraged many countries to develop national dementia plans, as well as international actions such as the G8 Dementia Summit in London, UK, in 2013 and the WHO Ministerial Conference on Global Action Against Dementia in Geneva, Switzerland, in 2015.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013) aims to bring together all available epidemiological data using a coherent measurement framework, standardised estimation methods, and transparent data sources to enable comparisons of health loss over time and across causes, age–sex groups, and countries. The GBD can be used to generate summary measures such as disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) and healthy life expectancy (HALE) that make possible comparative assessments of broad epidemiological patterns across countries and time.

The World Alzheimer Report 2015: 'The Global Impact of Dementia: An analysis of prevalence, incidence, cost and trends’ finds that there are currently around 46.8 million people living with dementia around the world, with numbers set to increase to 74.7 million by 2030 and 131.5 million by 2050.

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