Land degradation is occurring rapidly at a time of growing need for fertile soil and healthy ecosystems. Multi-scale solutions that ensure economic and environmental sustainability are needed.

A Guide to the Methodology of Estimating Transport Emissions Inventories and the Associated Social Cost. The Transport Emissions & Social Cost Assessment is a project under the World Resources Institute’s Sustainable and Livable Cities Program, funded by the Caterpillar Foundation.

The study report reviews the status of and the challenges facing the road sector under the sustainable development agenda, identifies the gap in the existing global institutional setting and the need for supporting sustainable development in the road sector, evaluates possible options to fill the gap and meet the need, and explores the viability

This report is aimed at readers who seek to build economic evidence in support of the inclusion of actions on agriculture in climate change plans and programmes, particularly at the national level under the umbrella of nationally determined contributions (NDCs) to the December 2015 Paris Agreement, which aims to restrict a rise in global tempera

Latin America hosts some of the world’s most dynamic renewable energy markets, with more than a quarter of primary energy coming from renewables, twice the global average.

The human and economic costs of air pollution in Africa are growing fast, according to a new OECD Development Centre study on the Cost of Air Pollution in Africa. Already, they are surpassing the costs associated with unsafe sanitation or underweight children.

A new report offers evidence that the modest investments needed to secure land rights for indigenous communities will generate billions in returns—economically, socially and environmentally—for local communities and the world’s changing climate.

Although the Ganges River Basin (GRB) has abundant water resources, the seasonal monsoon causes a mismatch in water supply and demand, which creates severe water-related challenges for the people living in the basin, the rapidly growing economy and the environment.

Experts have calculated the cost of pollution in China for years, weighing the drag on productivity from medical costs, factory closures and traffic restrictions. Now economists say they know exactly how much consumers are willing to pay to clean their own air.

Experts have calculated the cost of pollution in China for years, weighing the drag on productivity from medical costs, factory closures and traffic restrictions. Now economists say they know exactly how much consumers are willing to pay to clean their own air.

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