Cars are a major source of greenhouse gas pollution in Australian cities, the latest report explains. Transport is Australia’s third largest source of greenhouse gas emissions, with emissions from transport increasing nearly 60% since 1990, more than any other sector. Cars are responsible for roughly half of all transport emissions.

This discussion paper explores key issues and options to ensure robust accounting of international transfers from market mechanisms under Article 6 of the Paris Agreement. The paper first provides an overview of key issues that must be addressed to ensure robust account and highlights approaches to address them.

Current commitments under the Paris Agreement are not sufficient to limit global warming to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels; the UNEP Emissions Gap Report 2015 showed that a mitigation gap of 14 GtCO2e exists for 2030. Against this background international climate initiatives can play an important role for reducing global emissions.

Increasingly, companies across sectors and geographies are turning to an internal carbon price as one tool to help them reduce carbon emissions, mitigate climate-related business risks, and identify opportunities in the transition to a low-carbon economy.

States and territories are the driving force behind Australia’s transition to clean, affordable and efficient renewable energy and storage technology, a new report has found.

This briefing presents the results of a preliminary analysis into United States’ subnational and non-state action and its impact on national greenhouse gas emissions, if fully implemented. The analysis covers commitments from individual actors, which set quantitative mitigation targets and for which historical emissions data are available.

This briefing presents progress made by the EU and Member States in meeting their emission ceilings that are applicable since 2010 and which remain applicable until 2019 under the new National Emission Ceilings (NEC) Directive; (EU) ; EU, 2016).

G20 and Climate Change: Time to Lead for a Safer Future, by CARE International, outlines the current G20 climate change picture and provides recommendations on key steps and agreements G20 countries need to take in 2017 and at the upcoming leader’s summit (7/8 July in Hamburg, Germany).

The UN Paris Agreement puts in place a legally binding mechanism to increase mitigation action over time. Countries put forward pledges called nationally determined contributions (NDC) whose impact is assessed in global stocktaking exercises. Subsequently, actions can then be strengthened in light of the Paris climate objective: limiting global mean temperature increase to well below 2 °C and pursuing efforts to limit it further to 1.5 °C. However, pledged actions are currently described ambiguously and this complicates the global stocktaking exercise.'

The report is a one stop shop for learning about key developments and prospects of existing and emerging carbon initiatives. There is a continued momentum for carbon pricing. As of 2017, over 40 national and 25 subnational jurisdictions representing almost a quarter of global greenhouse gas emissions are putting a price on carbon.

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