Climate change mitigation projects in developing countries have the potential for significant negative impacts on land users. In particular, land users with socially legitimate but informal tenure that is not recorded using a statutory process are at risk of exploitation from the powerful elite. A detailed understanding of de facto property rights is important in protecting the
rights of legitimate beneficiaries of climate change mitigation projects, and this is recognized in international declarations.

This article highlights the land tenure implications of payment for environmental services (PES) mechanisms to reduce carbon emissions and enhance carbon sequestration, and offers suggestions for incorporating tenure into PES strategies.

Reducing Urban Poverty: A New Generation of Ideas highlights the research and innovative thinking of the next generation of urban planners, practitioners and policymakers.

This paper discusses ideas and methodologies on reducing urban poverty, paying particular attention to the changes that can be triggered by the practice of community savings.

The tribal and ecological history of India has been the history of forced transformation of the natural commons into private property engineered under both the colonial and post colonial state policy. In the following period of structural adjustment programme during and after the 1990s the state has opened the public domain for privatisation by the trans–national corporations and Indian small and large companies. Natural commons is being treated as capital.

This report is intended to provide an overview of forest tenure in Asia between 2002 and 2010, building on and updating previous regional tenure studies undertaken by the Rights and Resources Initiative, and RRI and the International Tropical Timber Organization.

The purpose of this assessment is to identify the constraints to and opportunities for women‘s participation in REDD+ initiatives, particularly as country REDD+ readiness plans are being developed, as well as to reveal the potential impacts of gender relations on REDD+ initiatives and vice versa.

This brief presents some preliminary results of a legal analysis conducted by RRI to provide a fuller picture of Indigenous Peoples and community forest tenure rights globally. This analysis unpacks the collective rights to forestland and forest resources held by communities and codified in law.

It is the peasantry that cry loudly and piteously for relief, and our programme must deal with their present condition. Real reflief can only come by a great change in the land laws and the basis of the present system of land tenure. We have among us many big landowners, and we welcome them. But they must realise that the ownership of large estates by individuals, which is the outcome of a state resembling the old feudalism of Europe, is a rapidly disappearing phenomenon all over the world.

In order for REDD+ carbon emission mitigation targets to be reached, the primary driver of forest clearing globally, agriculture, must be fundamentally addressed by governments implementing REDD+ Programmes. This paper evaluates the extent to which countries

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