The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) published a policy brief summarizing OECD analyses showing that the cost of action to mitigate climate change would be minimized if a cost-effective set of policy instruments, with a focus on carbon pricing, were applied as broadly as possible across all emission sources, including all countries, sectors, and greenhouse gases.

Sectoral approaches are proposed as a means to broaden the global scope of greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation to developing countries. Market mechanisms are put forward in that context to create incentives for mitigation in developing countries beyond the existing Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), and to

This paper examines the cost of a range of national, regional and global mitigation policies and the corresponding incentives for countries to participate in ambitious international mitigation actions.

This paper examines the cost of a range of national, regional and global mitigation policies and the corresponding incentives for countries to participate in ambitious international mitigation actions.

There are local air pollution benefits from pursuing greenhouse gases emissions mitigation policies, which lower the net costs of emission reductions and thereby may strengthen the incentives to participate in a global climate change mitigation agreement. The main purpose of this paper is to assess the extent to

There are local air pollution benefits from pursuing greenhouse gases emissions mitigation policies, which lower the net costs of emission reductions and thereby may strengthen the incentives to participate in a global climate change mitigation agreement. The main purpose of this paper is to assess the extent to

This Policy Guidance is intended to provide policy makers and practitioners in development co-operation agencies with information and advice on how to mainstream climate change into development.

This report, titled

This report seeks to inform critical questions with regard to policy mixes of investments in adaptation and mitigation, and how they might vary over time.

This publication demonstrates that natural resources can contribute to growth, employment, exports and fiscal revenues in low-income countries, where natural capital constitutes a quarter of total wealth. It highlights the importance of policies encouraging the sustainable management of these resources.

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