Fourth version of Airpocalypse report by Greenpeace India, has identified 231 Indian cities out of 287 with more than 52 monitoring days data in 2018 under National Ambient Air Quality Monitoring Programme (NAMP), where air pollution levels exceeded the 60 µg/m3 limits for PM10 as prescribed under National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS).

This paper discusses ways to identify investments that can be accounted as low-carbon activities. The focus is on the EU Taxonomy, as in the near future it will have to be assessed to what extent this emerging tool can be useful for implementation of the climate finance landscape methodology.

India Inc has shown a modest uptick when it comes to disclosure of climate change risk due to increasing awareness about global warming and a growing band of climate-conscious investors, reveals a recent report released by CDP (Carbon Disclosure Project) India.

This report provides an overview of global and regional trends in employment, unemployment, labour force participation and productivity, as well as dimensions of job quality such as employment status, informal employment and working poverty. It also examines income and social developments, and provides an indicator of social unrest.

India has been ranked very low at 76th place out of 82 countries on a new Social Mobility Index compiled by the World Economic Forum, while Denmark has topped the charts.

The costs related to nature loss are now emerging as unanticipated business risks and systemic risks to economies says this new report by WEF.

Despite humanitarian information being more available than ever, confusion persists as to what the information means, how to analyze it and turn it into actionable evidence, and how to ensure that evidence-based actions are actually undertaken on a timely basis.

This brief draws on a two-year project that aimed to strengthen the capacities of farmers and government officials to understand and share appropriate climate information and best practices to inform agricultural decision-making in Nigeria.

The landscape of urban mobility is changing. The change is driven by many issues: urbanization and socio-economic shifts; increasing concerns around resiliency; citizen engagement; digital disruption and shifting customer needs. Mobility infrastructure and business models are adapting to the new environment.

Given the growing international pressure to mitigate climate change and increasing fears around climate impacts, expectations of continued investment in fossil fuels in Southeast Asia’s power sector appear puzzling.

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